Chinese brush pot

by stan
(Milwaukie Oregon)

Hello Peter, and everone, here is a brush pot, I think thats what it is, I am not sure, it is 3" x 3" at the bottom and it is 2-1/8" high, the square opening at the top is 3/4" x 3/4" from inside to inside, it has a Da Qing Qianlong Nian ahi,,, mark, this brush pot appears to be old but I do not think it is of the period any information would be helpful, thanks again, I will send more photos. from stan.

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new brush pot
by: stan

Thanks Peter, your absolutely right, I should have known better, there is nothing like comparing the old to the new, they are two worlds apart, I will pay more attention to detail in the future. thanks again for you expert opinion.

Chinese brush pot
by: stan

Hi Peter, thanks for keeping me in line, I did buy this though, I bought it because I liked it and you are quite right it is contemporary, I thought though that it was older than vintage like maybe 1920 do you think, you don't think its bran new do you?

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Chinese brush pot

by stan
(Milwaukie Oregon)

Hi Peter, here is the last set of photo's, I forgot to mention that the crackle glaze im sure was made that way, looking forward to hearing from you and your expert opinion, thanks so much, Stan.

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age
by: peter

Stan, the definition of age is somewhat fluid, and varies according to location. When we mean new or recently made we cannot know when something was made, actually . But we see a lot of imitations, fakes, and new products, and how they are different from the antique ones, and how these differences themselves changed over time.

From experience I would say it is fairly recent. Probably not more than 20-30 years; could be even very recent. Vintage items do not have such a bottom. Many items from the 1930s still retain some features reminiscent of those made twenty years earlier, even if the decoration changed. But glazes, unglazed rims and shapes often tell what the decoration or colors do not tell.. I cannot see anything traditional either in style or workmanship in this, I'm afraid. The bottom is really telling us that it is unlikely from the first half of the 20th century. I'm convinced that the consistency or density of the paste of the foot rim is also typical for much later items. You could compare the rim consistency with those of known antiques of the early 20th century, using a good magnifier.

PS: If you are interested in carved porcelain, you should get an idea of the quality that artisans like Wang Bing-rong and others produced in the 19th century. The current one can hardly compare.

brush washer
by: peter

Hi Stan,
That would be a brush washer.
I think this is contemporary. Not a fake, really, as it is too obvious...
(You posted some 5-6 submissions, some duplicate, and I am afraid one of them might have been a closeup picture of the other side. But I think these will do.)

The reasons that I think this is more recent are:

- The shape: I have never seen such a porcelain item with animal heads on the sides. These do usually only appear on vases and censers.
- You are right about the crackles. And, the carving isn't something traditional, in my view. - The attire of the people is completely out of line with regular decorations. For example the hat I see on one man looks like a Mongol hat. The lady on the other side looks as if she were wearing Korean dress.
- The foot rim looks perfectly like a 20th century (more recent) rim to me. If it were Qing dynasty, this would be either a flat, unglazed foot, or a glazed one with a narrow rim.
Flat rims like this are usually a sign of of more recent manufacture.

I would not buy this, if you didn't already.

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