Chinese Export? Imari? Unusual Green & White HELP!

by Gail
(Augusta, GA, USA)

These two small bowls (unmarked) were found among an extensive collection of authenticated Chinese Export and other marked porcelain items in an elderly woman's estate. Trim is reddish brown. The color is somewhere between lime and celery and the artwork is well done. Do any of you experts know what these pretty little bowls might be? Age? Value? Thanks for any help you can provide!

Comments for Chinese Export? Imari? Unusual Green & White HELP!

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Nov 23, 2010
Green and White Bowls
by: Anonymous

Thank you! I was thinking it had an "Imari" look; and there is some evidence of transferware, especially around the outside of the bowls. The interior artwork, however, is awfully good...really doesn't look so much like transferware. I'll post a close up. Also, the colors didn't strike me as particularly Japanese. Definitely a puzzler. Thanks so much for your response!!!

Nov 23, 2010
Japanese porcelain
by: Anonymous

Hi Gail,
I'm afraid this looks like Japanese transfer ware to me. That is an early type of porcelain printing. This can be verified with a close-up partial picture ofthe decoration. In hand decorated porcelain it is usually possible to see the brush strokes with a magnifier.

You actually provide part of your own answer:

>These two small bowls (unmarked) were found among
>an extensive collection of authenticated Chinese >Export and other marked porcelain items in an >elderly woman's estate.

They are not Chinese, so does it mean they were authenticated as Chinese, or where they not authenticated? The pattern of the central medallion looks typical Japanese to me.

As to its age, as I am specialized on Chinese antiques, I have no way to reliably tell you.

But, I can tell you more about transfer printing. This was used on Japanese porcelain since the 19th century, and was probably exported to the west. On the other hand, it appears that transfer printing appears to have been used in China only from the 20th century.

I would suggest you get a second opinion on this.



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